Surge pricing in two markets

December 19, 2014

Larry White writes:

People get worked up when Uber charges more at peak times (New Years Eve) or gas stations raise their prices (remember Sandy?). Why don’t we see the same in business markets? The price of transporting oil in super tankers has gone up by a factor of eight since the summer, but we don’t see any complaints.

In economic terms, both situations show supply and demand at work — and working pretty well, I’d say. So why the different reactions? Why no accusations of “unfairness” or “gouging” when businesses are on both sides of the market? Are businesses simply more experienced in dealing with fluctuations? Less appealing as victims? More likely to understand how supply and demand work?

Please submit your answers to Larry.

Advertisements

One Response to “Surge pricing in two markets”

  1. Andrew Stak Says:

    The always incredibly thoughtful Steve Randy Waldman of interfluidity had an excellent write up on why surge pricing may not be as cut an dry a case as it might seem on the surface…

    http://www.interfluidity.com/v2/5822.html


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: